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Europe (EU)

Each year, the University of Wolverhampton welcome hundreds of students, staff members and partners from over all over Europe. We pride ourselves on being a friendly community in the heart of the UK, striving to be a truly global institution. And we couldn’t do it without any of you, regardless of where you are from.

In this page, we aim to provide answers to some frequently asked questions regarding Brexit. However, if you have further queries please contact us as follows:

E: international@wlv.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)1902 322474 (09.00am to 17.00pm Mon-Fri UK Time)

Information for current EU students

According to the information gathered from Universities UK and gov.uk, EU, EEA and Swiss nationals students who started a full degree course in September 2020 or before, who arrived in the UK before 31 December 2020, are:

  • Eligible to apply for the UK’s EU Settlement Scheme, allowing them to remain in the UK after studying, provided they have applied by 30 June 2021. Students should still apply to the EUSS even if they do not intend to stay in the UK long-term. Successful applicants to the EUSS will be given the immigration status they need to continue studying in the UK beyond 30 June 2021 and will be eligible for public services such as healthcare.
  • Eligible for home fee status and the tuition fee loan
  • Eligible for home student fees and financial support throughout their degree.
COVID-19 Update

According to recent Home Office communications:

"EU, EEA and Swiss students who were studying in the UK, but who have returned home during the pandemic and are continuing with their course online in their home country

EU, EEA and Swiss students who were studying in the UK, but who have returned home during the pandemic and are continuing with their course online in their home country (when they would otherwise be studying in the UK) are able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme from outside the UK, so long as they are able to prove that they are still continuously resident in the UK. This means that they must not have been absent from the UK for more than six months in any 12-month period, except for a single absence of no more than 12 months for an important reason, for example, due to studying outside the UK because of COVID-19. They will still be continuously resident in the UK for the purposes of the scheme.

EU, EEA and Swiss students have commenced their course online in their home country due to COVID-19, and who otherwise would be studying in the UK

EU, EEA and Swiss nationals who have commenced their course online in their home country due to COVID-19, and who otherwise would be studying in the UK, will be eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme as long as they arrive in the UK by 31 December 2020. Students unable to arrive in the UK by 31 December 2020 will be required to apply to the Student Route under the points-based immigration system, to commence studying in the UK.

In summary, if you are currently studying remotely outside the UK and have not been previously been resident in the UK you must enter the UK on or before 11 pm on 31 December 2020. You should then make an application under EUSS as soon as possible.

EU, EEA and Swiss students who are currently studying a UK course, have left the UK temporarily, but have not applied to the EUSS and may not be in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you were studying in the UK and have returned home during the pandemic and are continuing with your course online in your home country (when you would otherwise be studying in the UK), you are able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme from outside the UK, so long as you are able to prove that you are still continuously resident in the UK. This means that you must not have been absent from the UK for more than six months in any 12-month period, except for a single absence of no more than 12 months for an important reason, for example, due to studying outside the UK because of COVID-19. You will still be continuously resident in the UK for the purposes of the scheme."

  

I have already applied for and been granted pre-settled or settled status. What can I do next?

If you have already been granted pre-settled or settled status under EUSS, then you have secured your continued right to study in the UK after 31 December 2020. Make sure you can access proof of your status through the online checking service. You may need to provide this to the University in the future.

If you have been granted pre-settled status and would like to apply for settled status in the future, you need to be aware of the eligibility criteria for settled status. There are strict rules on how long you are permitted to be outside of the UK to qualify for settled status.

You are allowed absences of:

  • up to six months in any 12 month period
  • one-off period between six and 12 months for ‘an important reason’

Please see the section on ‘continuous qualifying period’ in the EU Settlement Scheme caseworker guidance.

If I leave the UK, do I lose settlement status?

If you have settled status, this would be lost after an absence of five years from the UK (this is still subject to approval from Parliament). If you have pre-settled status, this would be lost after an absence of more than two years from the UK.

If you lose your status and you are no longer eligible to apply under the settlement scheme, you will only be able to apply under any other category of the Immigration Rules in place at the time you wish to come to the UK.

Information for EU students starting their course in January 2021

EU students who are starting a full degree course in January 2021 and have arrived in the UK before 1 January 2021 are:

  • Eligible for home fee status and the tuition fee loan
  • Eligible to apply for the UK’s EU Settlement Scheme, allowing them to remain in the UK after studying, provided they have applied by 30 June 2021.

Information for EU students starting their course in September 2021

EU students who are starting a full degree course in September 2021 and arriving in the UK after 31 December 2020:

If you are starting your studies at WLV in January 2021, you may wish to consider arriving in the UK before 1 January 2021, as this will make you eligible to apply for permission to stay in the UK under the EU settlement scheme instead of having to apply for a student visa or a visitor visa.

How do I apply for a UK degree after August 2021?

You need to follow the normal application process as before by submitting your application via our website, one of our agents, or via UCAS

Remember, if you’re thinking of starting a course in the UK from August 2021 onwards, you will need to check more information about the fees charged for that academic year by the University.  

Students from the EU, EEA-EFTA or Switzerland who start new courses in England or Scotland after August 2021 will also no longer be eligible for student loans (Northern Ireland and Wales will announce arrangements in due course). Though, there may be other forms of financial support you can apply for. 

How will Brexit affect my graduate job prospects?

If you arrive in the UK before 1 January 2020, and you successfully apply to the EU Settlement Scheme, you have the right to live and work in the UK as part of your status. The scheme is free of charge and you should apply as soon as possible after you’ve arrived in the UK, and by 30 June 2021.

Will I be able to stay in the UK after graduating?

Any student arriving in the UK on or before 31 December 2020 will be able to apply for ‘pre-settled status’ as part of the EU Settlement Scheme. This will allow you to stay in the UK for five years and then apply for ‘settled status’. Once you have settled status, you’ll be able to remain in the UK indefinitely.

The Graduate Route (or post-study work) will be accessible to any Tier 4 Student or Student visa holders who’ve successfully completed an undergraduate degree or higher in the country, with a track record of compliance. From January 2021 onwards, EU citizens would have to apply for the post-study work visa to stay in the UK for two years after their degree (three years after completing a PhD) to work or look for work at any skills level.

 

As an EU Undergraduate, Postgraduate (taught or research) student, will I still be eligible for home fee status after the UK leaves the EU?

Students from the European Union wishing to study in Britain from the 2021 academic year will “no longer be eligible for home fee status, undergraduate, postgraduate and advanced learner financial support from Student Finance England for courses starting in the academic year 2021/22".

The fee arrangements for EU students intending to start their degree in the 2021/22 academic year are yet to be announced by the University of Wolverhampton.

The University of Wolverhampton fees for international students vary from between £12,250 and £14,867 depending on the chosen degree.

I’m a non-EEA national. Is there any direct impact on me or my fees?

The referendum has no effect upon the UK immigration scheme and there are no predictable changes to the system by which non-EEA nationals can visit, study, work, or settle in the United Kingdom.

If you need further advice, reach out to our Student Funding Team to ask any questions about funding or loans.

Will I need a visa to study my degree in the UK?

From 1 January 2021, the UK will implement the new points-based system: Student Route to EU students. This means from 1 January 2021, if you do not already live in the UK or have rights under the Withdrawal Agreement, you will need to meet specific requirements and apply to the new points-based system: Student route to stay in the UK.

Moreover, “if you arrive in the UK before 31 December 2020, there’s very little that will change as long as you register for the EU Settlement Scheme. If you’re an EU citizen and you start living in the UK by 31 December 2020, you and your family can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme and continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021. The deadline for applying is 30 June 2021.

If you arrive from 1 January 2021 onwards, there will be some changes. Many of these are still subject to negotiations, but the UK government, the British Council, and universities in the UK are working very hard to make any new arrangements as simple as possible.

The main changes are: 

Arrive in the UK before 1 January 2021

No changes; apply for EU Settlement Scheme to stay longer than 30 June 2021 (if you want to remain in the UK beyond 30 June 2021 and keep ‘home fee status’ beyond this date)

Arrive in the UK after 1 January 2021 and start your course before 31 July 2021

Changes to immigration status, no changes to fee status

Arrive in the UK after 1 January 2021 and start your course after 1 August 2021

Changes to immigration status and fee status (for studies in England or Scotland)

Source: study-uk.britishcouncil.org/moving-uk/eu-students

The table below summarises the main differences between the EU settlement scheme and the Student Route:

 

EU Settlement Scheme

Student Route

Application fee

Free

£348 GBP

Validity period

5 years at degree level

2 years below degree level

Course duration + 4 months for courses lasting 12 months or more

Maintenance requirement

None

£9,207 + course fees for the first year saved for at least 28 days before application *the money will be required to be in the student’s own bank account or parents/legal guardian

Working hours

Unlimited

Up to 20 hours a week in term time (degree level or above)

Full time outside term time (all levels)

Healthcare

Free access to NHS

Healthcare surcharge: £470 per year of visa

                               More information on VISA can be accessed here: www.gov.uk/student-visa

 

My family and I live in the UK. What should we do to stay in the UK as an EU citizen?

If you are from an EU country (except Ireland), Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland or an Erasmus exchange student you and your family will need to apply to continue living in the UK after 31 December 2020.

If you are from the Irish Republic you don't need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. The rights of Irish citizens residing in the UK are protected after the UK leaves the EU under the UK-Ireland Common Travel Area arrangements. This means that Irish citizens do not need to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme.

Please find complete governmental information here.

Who should I contact if I have queries about my situation?

The University’s Visa and Immigration Support Team provides information on a range of student-related immigration matters for applicants, students and their family members.

The University of Wolverhampton is working with Universities UK, the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA), the British Council and the UK Government to make sure you have the best experience possible with us.

How will the University keep me updated?

The University will communicate with you directly via your University of Wolverhampton website and social media channels when there are significant updates. This specific page will also be regularly updated and revised to reflect up-to-date information.

You can also use our website and social media platforms to contact us.

I am an EU citizen travelling to the UK after 1st January 2021. What arrangements will I need to put in place?

EU, EEA and Swiss citizens will continue to be able to travel to the UK for holidays or short trips without needing a visa. You’ll be able to cross the UK border using a valid passport.

Most likely, the British Government will stop accepting national ID cards for entry to the UK for EEA and Swiss citizens after 2020. Further details will be announced, including the date for this change.

However, if you began living in the UK before 31 December 2020 and obtain status under the EU Settlement Scheme, you’ll be able to use your EEA or Swiss national identity card to enter the UK until at least 31 December 2025.

You must have the correct documents to show at the UK border if you’re travelling to the UK from 1 January 2021.

Updated information on this matter can be found here.

I am a UK citizen and I want to travel to Europe after 1st January 2021. What arrangements will I need to put in place?

For the latest information on visiting Europe from 1 January 2021, please visit the government’s website.

According to gov.uk you might need to pay a healthcare surcharge (called the ‘immigration health surcharge’ or IHS) as part of your immigration application. The UK government has published information about access to healthcare for EU, EEA and Swiss nationals visiting the UK after Brexit. You will still be able to use your EHIC issued by the country where you live if you arrive in the UK before the end of the transition period (31 December 2020). This cover will last until the end of your stay, even if after exit day.

Eligible students are advised to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme for pre-settled/settled status as this protects your access to healthcare after the transition period as well as your immigration status. Your EHIC may not be valid if you arrive in the UK after the end of the transition period. You should buy insurance to cover your healthcare as you would if visiting another non-EU country.

Further information about access to healthcare for EU, EEA and Swiss students is available on the UKCISA (UK Council for International Student Affairs) website.

Can EU students still come to the UK on the Erasmus+ exchange programme?

According to the British Council, “the UK will continue to participate fully in the current Erasmus+ programme, which lasts until the end of 2020. Participants, who study, train, volunteer or spend time abroad through Erasmus+ exchanges that were confirmed during the current programme (2014-2020) can participate fully and for the full duration of their exchange. This covers UK participants going abroad and international participants coming to the UK. The UK’s participation in future Erasmus+ programmes is part of discussions between the UK government and the EU and has not yet been finalised. 

“The British Council, the Erasmus+ UK National Agency (British Council and Ecorys UK) and Universities UK are strongly supportive of continued and full UK participation in Erasmus+ after the UK leaves the European Union so that UK and EU students can continue to benefit from Erasmus+ opportunities over the longer term.”

For the most up-to-date information on Erasmus+, go to the UK National Agency website.

Following withdrawal from the European Union, the UK will continue to participate in programmes financed by the Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) 2014-2020 until their closure. This includes Horizon 2020, the EU’s current €80 billion research and innovation programme. The UK Government’s position is to ensure UK Institutions continue to have full access to Horizon 2020 funding.

What does the transition period mean for current Horizon 2020?

Participants will continue to receive EU grant funding for the lifetime of individual Horizon 2020 projects, including projects finishing after the transition period ends at the end of 2020

Any affected grant holders should contact UKRI at EUGrantsFunding@ukri.org